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Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

Coronary AngiographyAngiograf­a coronaria

Coronary Angiography

Angiography is a special type of x-ray that allows your coronary arteries to be viewed and recorded on film. Your doctor can see if the blood vessels to your heart are clogged.

Insertion sites may be in the groin or the arm
Insertion sites may be in the groin or the arm.
Monitors let the doctor follow the catheter's progress during the procedure
Monitors let the doctor follow the catheter's progress during the procedure.
Before the Procedure

  • Tell your doctor what medicines you take and any allergies you may have.

  • Don't eat or drink anything after midnight, the night before the procedure.

During the Procedure

  • A long, thin tube called a catheter is placed inside an artery in your groin or arm and guided into your heart.

  • A contrast dye is injected through the catheter into your blood vessels or heart chambers.

  • X-rays are taken to to show clear photos of the inside of your heart and coronary arteries.

After the Procedure

Call Your Doctor If:

  • You have angina (chest pain).

  • The insertion site has pain, swelling, redness, bleeding, or drainage.

  • You have severe pain, coldness, or a bluish color in the leg or arm that held the catheter.

  • You experience blood in your urine, black or tarry stools, or any other kind of bleeding.

  • You have a fever over 101.0°F.

  • You need to remain lying down for 6-12 hours.

  • If the insertion site was in your groin, you may need to lie down with your leg still for several hours.

  • A nurse will check your blood pressure and the insertion site.

  • You may be asked to drink fluid to help flush the contrast liquid out of your system.

  • Have someone drive you home from the hospital.

  • It's normal to find a small bruise or lump at the insertion site. These common side effects should disappear within a few weeks.

Publication Source: Radiological Society of North America

Publication Source: American Heart Association

Online Source: Radiological Society of North America

Online Source: American Heart Association

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2002-07-09T00:00:00-06:00

Jay L. Jordan, MD, is an experienced cardiologist and internal medicine physician who provides a comprehensive range of cardiac care services in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Glendale, Burbank, Calabasas and nearby communities. Take the first step in preventing and controlling heart disease with symptoms such as angina, arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, cardiomyopathy, carotid artery disease, chest pain, congestive heart failure, coronary vascular disease, hypertension, palpitations, shortness of breath and stroke. Call Dr. Jay L. Jordan at 310-854-5493 or request an appointment online.

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