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Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

Coronary AngioplastyAngioplastia coronaria

Coronary Angioplasty

Your doctor will talk to you about your heart problem and explain how angioplasty can help. Angioplasty relieves symptoms of coronary artery disease by improving blood flow to your heart.

The blood flow to the heart muscle increases
The blood flow to the heart muscle increases.

The balloon compresses the plaque against the artery wall
The balloon compresses the plaque against the artery wall.
During the Procedure

  • A guide wire is inserted through the guiding catheter (a thin, flexible tube) and moved to the narrow spot in your artery. Your doctor tracks its movement on an angiogram, a special kind of x-ray.

  • A balloon-tipped catheter is inserted through the guiding catheter and threaded over the guide wire. It is positioned at the narrow part of the artery.

  • The balloon is inflated and deflated several times to compress the plaque against the artery wall. You may feel angina (chest pain) when the balloon is inflated. Tell your doctor if you do.

  • The balloon is deflated and the catheters and guide wire are removed. The artery is now open, and blood flow to the heart muscle increases.

After the Procedure

  • Image of patient having insertion site checked You'll need to remain lying down for 6-12 hours.

  • If the insertion site was in your groin, you may need to lie down with your leg still for several hours.

  • A nurse will check the insertion site and your blood pressure. Before going home, you may have a chest x-ray and other tests.

  • You usually remain in the hospital for several hours or overnight.

Call Your Doctor If:

  • You have angina (chest pain).

  • The insertion site has pain, swelling, redness, bleeding, or drainage.

  • You have severe pain, coldness, or a bluish color in the leg or arm that held the catheter.

  • You experience blood in your urine, black or tarry stools, or any other kind of bleeding.

  • You have a fever over 101.0°F.

Publication Source: American College of Radiology, Radiological Society of North America

Publication Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Publication Source: Society for Vascular Surgery

Online Source: American College of Radiology, Radiological Society of North America

Online Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Online Source: Society for Vascular Surgery

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2002-07-09T00:00:00-06:00

Jay L. Jordan, MD, is an experienced cardiologist and internal medicine physician who provides a comprehensive range of cardiac care services in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, Santa Monica, Glendale, Burbank, Calabasas and nearby communities. Take the first step in preventing and controlling heart disease with symptoms such as angina, arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, cardiomyopathy, carotid artery disease, chest pain, congestive heart failure, coronary vascular disease, hypertension, palpitations, shortness of breath and stroke. Call Dr. Jay L. Jordan at 310-854-5493 or request an appointment online.

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I came in for a routine physical and everything went great. Dr. Jordan was amazing. Would recommend coming to see Dr. Jordan all the time.
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